Barnaby and the Zilligong

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by Steven-Gregory: O’Dell

[This story was the result of waking one morning and the first thought that came to mind was that I must write a Dr. Seuss-type of story. I thought, “I’ve never done anything remotely similar to that before, so this should be ‘interesting,’ to say the least.” But by the end of the day, even with lengthy interruptions, this was the product. I am convinced it was inspired. Now all I need is an illustrator, a literary agent and a publisher. Any takers?]

~~//~~
Barnaby Brundage set out one Fall,
sailing his Yim in a raging squall.
He had no fear, for he needed to know
the answer to questions that bothered him so.
He’d tried all he could and didn’t succeed,
but wouldn’t give up; he’d find it indeed.

The question he had that weighed on him heavy
was why there’s no peace, when all seemed so ready.
They all said they wanted to be happy with neighbors,
but it seemed now and then they resorted to sabers.
And no one had peace while such ruckus ensued,
but no one had answers on just what to do.

As no one in town could answer his query,
young Barnaby left in somewhat a hurry.
He packed only things that would get him to where
the answers must lie, to hear if he dare,
for sometimes the truth will hurt, as he knew,
but nothing but truth for Barnaby would do.

When all in his town had thought and were wrong,
they said, “No one knows but the Zilligong.”
For the Zilligong had brains that made him real smart,
but far more than that, the Zilligong had heart.
And if answers were needed, then everyone knew
the Zilligong had them, they knew that was true.

The Zilligong had, the story was told,
once lived among them, through heat and through cold.
And everyone sought him for answers to questions
that they could not answer, to learn all the lessons
that made life more happy when folks live together,
that made them smile in all kinds of weather.

At some point in the past, and no one knew why,
the Zilligong packed bags, then waved them goodbye.
He said not a word as he went on his way,
and no one knew how long or where he would stay.
But one thing was sure, they all worried now,
when questions were quested, who would answer and how?

So Barnaby Brundage, alone and determined,
set out on his mission, through whales or through vermin.
His Yim sometimes rose and his Yim sometimes fell
on waves of the sea that had fishy smell.
The fishes jumped and the fishes splashed
alongside the Yim they dithered and dashed.

And sometime about the third day, he guessed,
Barnaby’s Yim with a bump came to rest
and Barnaby woke to the sound of waves,
both crashing and bashing, but knew he was safe.
And looking up high to the mountain ahead,
he thought on the climb with some sense of dread.

But Barnaby knew, at the top of that peak
lay the answers that he had come so far to seek.
The Zilligong lived there, sure as could be
and the Zilligong, after all, was whom he must see.
With a huff and a puff, the boy pushed forth
and climbed where he could, for all he was worth.

His climbing was long and his climbing was hard,
but Barnaby knew he must push on, though tired.
More puffing and huffing and wheezing and more.
He had no idea what ahead lay in store.
But he knew if he stopped then he never would know
the answer he’d traveled so far to take home.

When Barnaby thought he could just go no further,
he gathered his wits, renewed all his fervor,
and taking a breath, gathered courage to climb
the last several feet to get there in time.
The sun was just rising, he’d climbed all the night,
and Barnaby Brundage was near out of fight.

And as the boy fell in a heap at the top,
stopping ’cause this was where he must stop,
gasping and groaning from the strain of the climb
he’d made getting here, with no thought in mind
but asking for truth he knew must be near;
he’d conquered his worries, his shyness and fear.

And as he lay there, too weak yet to move,
he felt a soft touch on his shoulder, in truth.
He lifted his gaze to behold such a face
as never he’d seen in all his young days.
A word hit his ear that calmed his concern–
“Welcome, my boy! Some answers you’ve earned.”

Barnaby knew that this must be
the Zilligong that he’d come to see.
The Zilligong gave him some water, some bread,
then patted the young boy on top of his head.
“Just rest here a moment, you’ll need it indeed,
and later we’ll talk of the answers you seek.”

“Yes, I do need to rest here awhile.”
“Then please do,” the Zilligong said with a smile.
So Barnaby sat and he drank and he ate
just as much as he could from his overstuffed plate
and when he had eaten and drunk to his fill,
he lay back and slept as exhausted boys will.

When Barnaby woke he heard music so sweet
that his ears wiggled happily as he tapped his feet.
The Zilligong played on a Tweedler and Frump,
squeezing on one while the other he pumped.
It made the boy sing at the top of his lungs
and dancing and twirling, he jumped and he spun.

When at last all the music had faded away,
Barnaby found himself having to say,
“I’ve never heard music that sounded so nice.
It made my heart leap twice as high as the sky.
Did you play such music when living in town
or learn it up here, not when you were down?”

“I did it down there, but the folks wouldn’t dance.
I did it each day and I gave them the chance,
but they didn’t hear me on Tweedler and Frump.
They went on their way, looking down in the dump.
Watching their sadness just made me sad, too,
so moving up here was the wise thing to do.”

Barnaby looked at the ground as a tear
escaped from his eye and it fell very near.
Hitting the ground and soaking in fast,
he knew in an instant that sadness can’t last,
for where it had fallen, so teary and wet,
up sprang a Borple plant, radiant and red.

Surprise covered Barnaby, from head to toe,
“A tear hits the gound and Borple plants grow?”
“Oh, yes,” said the Zilligong, dancing for glee,
“It means that your heart’s like the one that’s in me.
It means you have wisdom, your answers are sure,
for deep in your heart lies just what will cure.”

“But I’m just a boy, so how could I know
the answers they need and which way to go?”
The Zilligong gently touched Barnaby’s cheek.
“The fact that you ask shows wisdom, you see.
The others don’t ask, they just carry on,
ignoring the questions ’til wisdom is gone.”

Barnaby now scratched his head for a few,
he wrinkled his brow, thinking, ‘What shall I do?’
Then something inside him clicked nearly out loud
and Barnaby smile, then laughed and was proud.
“Because I just ask, it leads me to learn,
’cause I never let opportunity burn!”

“That’s right!” said the Zilligong, proud as can be.
“Now you have wisdom, now you can see.
The fact that you ask will cause you to find
the answers you seek, expanding your mind.
The others don’t ask, so how can they know
when they won’t go looking–they won’t; oh, no-no!”

And with that the Zilligong stood up so tall
on his toes, so high the boy thought he might fall.
He reached for the sky and he smiled at the sun
in a way that told the boy it was just fun.
And dancing in circles, then jumping in glee,
the Zilligong said, “Now you can be me.”

“What?!” cried the boy, “How can that be?
I can’t be you and you can’t be me.”
The Zilligong lifted the boy in a hug,
he turned ’round in circles, then reached for a jug.
“Let’s drink now some Gurka juice. You’ll love it, I’m sure.
It’s great with the Borple fruit and this juice is pure.”

And Barnaby said, as he turned up his snout,
“Won’t you please tell me what this is about?”
The Zilligong looked down with love in his eyes,
a look that was deep and he couldn’t disguise.
“Zilligong isn’t a name, don’t you see?
It is a title; that’s how you’ll be me.”

“I’ll be the Zilligong? That’s what you mean?”
A nod and a pat, “My boy, now you’ve seen.
I’ve been here so long and no one has come
to ask me for answers. They want to stay dumb.
And even a Zilligong needs now and then
a little vacation to make some new friends.”

Now Barnaby grinned as he thought of the honor.
It wasn’t so much as he’d thought–it’s not power.
It’s loving and learning throughout your whole life
and sharing with others, with husbands and wives,
with children who ask all the questions they can,
so they can grow up into women and men.

“I’m proud to accept your humble request.
I promise you this, that I’ll do my best.
I’ll even learn to play Tweedler and Frump,
to keep other folks from feeling down in the dump.”
The Zilligong stood and unzipped his disguise
and revealed to the boy a surprise to his eyes.

“I’m not what I seem, young Barnaby boy.
I’ve been here so long that I almost lost joy.
As you see I’m a man, which is what you will be.
I was once you and now you’ll be me.
I’ll tell you my name, write it down and don’t lose.
The Zilligong really is ol’ Doctor Seuss.”

And Barnaby said, “Well, I’ve heard of you!
You’re kind and you’re funny, you’re wonderful, too.
Your stories were read to me while I was small
and now that I’m older, I love them all.”
The Zilligong smiled, for at last he was sure
that his legacy was safe and his tales would endure.

And that is the story, although it’s quite long,
how Barnaby Brundage learned a new song,
and got a new name and made a new friend
and started a mission he knew wouldn’t end,
for if there were even one girl or one boy
who wanted to learn, then there’d always be joy.

(C) 2012 Steven-Gregory: O’Dell

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